pollinator project

Pollinator Project

 

Since 2015, Pollinator Project has focused on supporting pollinators with wildflower seed packets that contain a non-GMO mix of annual and perennial seeds. Designed to bloom in all seasons with little input, these wildflowers provide necessary forage for pollinators of all kinds.

Annually, a portion net proceeds are donated to invertebrate conservation efforts.

Photo: a honeybee from the founder’s beehives enjoying some Gaillardia pulchella flowers planted from Pollinator Project wildflower seeds.

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Pollinator Project has made it easy for you to provide food for pollinators

Coreopsis tinctoria  - Plains Coreopsis - grown from Pollinator Project wildflower seeds

Coreopsis tinctoria - Plains Coreopsis - grown from Pollinator Project wildflower seeds




With many environmental threats to their habitat and survival, honeybees and other pollinators need all the help they can get in order to survive. You can make a difference by planting this mix of annual and perennial wildflowers in a plot of soil, planter, window box, or even just distribute them wherever you like—in an abandoned lot, on a street corner—any spot with soil and sun. Access to flower food sources is among one of the simplest ways to support pollinators in our ecosystem.

Pollinator Project founder, Chelsea — beeing with her bees.

Pollinator Project founder, Chelsea — beeing with her bees.

About

Chelsea is a long time careful/natural/hobbyist beekeeper, a coffee professional, and a cattle dog mom. She travels a fair amount to coffee producing countries, has a mean palate, enjoys making sourdough bread, and dabbles in playing the cello. Being with her bees is one of her happy places and she’s committed to learning always about insects, humans, and how they interact with each other (or don’t). She’s been known to be face-deep in one of her beehives while taking photos and videos for probably too long; thankfully, her bees have been patient overall.

What’s her favorite thing about honeybees? Glad you asked. It’s the beauty found in getting to know them: their collective noises, attitudes, movements, which all boil down to systems and mechanisms of communication. They are fascinating, a blessing to all, and Chelsea holds the belief they may likely be tiny buzzing aliens.

Pollinator Project was founded in 2015 when just about seven-too-many friends asked her how they could help bees without keeping them for themselves, so wildflower seed packets were born. She’s completing a certificate in Entomology, ever-trying to learn Spanish, and also keeping up on reading e-books on her Kindle—all the while attempting to slow down and stuffing herself into a hammock from time to time. Her sister is @bedheadfiber, whom she loves very much, and they often collaborate and support each other in both business and sisterly realms. Known to shed tears over bird songs and classical music, Chelsea is growing quite sensitive as the years go on, and deems that as one of her greatest achievements yet.


Macro x21 magnification of drone (male) bee.

Macro x21 magnification of drone (male) bee.

Macro x21 magnification of worker (female) bee.

Macro x21 magnification of worker (female) bee.

An unidentifiable species of bumble bee (Bombus) gettin’ in there.

An unidentifiable species of bumble bee (Bombus) gettin’ in there.

Macro x14 magnification of worker bees.

Macro x14 magnification of worker bees.

Bumblebee on Symphyotrichum novae-angliae (New England Aster)

Bumblebee on Symphyotrichum novae-angliae (New England Aster)

Pollinator Project founder, Chelsea, after a bee colony installation. (Juni carefully observing in the background)

Pollinator Project founder, Chelsea, after a bee colony installation. (Juni carefully observing in the background)

Queen spotting! (she’s the one with the green dot)           All images belong to Pollinator Project. Please contact for permission to use.

Queen spotting! (she’s the one with the green dot)









All images belong to Pollinator Project. Please contact for permission to use.